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Pacifying the Kingdom of France at the Beginning of the Wars of Religion: Historiography, Sources, and Examples

Abstract : The growth of the Huguenot churches during the 1550s provoked strong Catholic and monarchial reaction, and, in1562, religious warfare erupted. The strife shattered France for nearly four decades and subsided only with King Henry IV’s proclamation of the Edict of Nantes in 1598. Organized and reasonably well-financed armies vied on the battlefield in a series of eight civil-religious wars. Even after 1598, fierce, if less widespread conflict erupted on several occasions during second and third decades of the seventeenth century. Cardinal Richelieu’s siege and destruction of La Rochelle in 1628 and the Peace of Alès the following year finally broke Huguenot military power and effectively ended the movement’s political influence. In all of this, success on the battlefield clearly did not insure peace. Indeed, both sides worked individually and jointly in a lengthy pacification process designed to insure the civil rights of the Huguenot minority. A variety of bipartisan commissions and courts emerged with the express purpose of settling festering points of conflict and promoting coexistence, if not necessarily toleration.
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Submitted on : Thursday, January 26, 2017 - 1:21:26 PM
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Jérémie Foa. Pacifying the Kingdom of France at the Beginning of the Wars of Religion: Historiography, Sources, and Examples . Raymond Mentzer and Bertrand Van Ruymbeke. A Companion to the Huguenots, 68, Brill, pp.90-117, 2016, 9789004310377. ⟨10.1163/9789004310377_006⟩. ⟨hal-01446851⟩

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