Self-Consciousness or Misattribution Effect in the Induced Hypocrisy Paradigm? Mirror, Mirror on the Wall…

Abstract : In a forced compliance situation, Scheier and Carver have shown that making high private self-consciousness salient through exposure to a mirror inhibits the arousal of dissonance and the subsequent attitude change. Based on these results, the aim of our study is to examine an alternate theoretical interpretation of the absence of attitude change. From our point of view, the mirror could have the status of a misattribution cue, thus maintaining the arousal. To test this hypothesis within the induced hypocrisy paradigm, participants first completed the private self-consciousness scale. Then they took part in one of the following conditions: (1) no mirror/no hypocrisy, (2) no mirror/hypocrisy, and (3) mirror/hypocrisy. Behavioral change and psychological discomfort were measured. Results indicated that participants in the mirror/hypocrisy condition were the most inclined to change and reported the greatest psychological discomfort. These results revealed that participants experienced dissonance when exposed to the mirror and support the hypothesis of misattribution.
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Article dans une revue
Psychological Reports, Ammons Scientific, In press, 〈10.1177/0033294117730845〉
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https://hal-amu.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01621535
Contributeur : Valérie Fointiat <>
Soumis le : lundi 23 octobre 2017 - 16:00:51
Dernière modification le : mardi 5 décembre 2017 - 11:06:01

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Audrey Pelt, Valérie Fointiat. Self-Consciousness or Misattribution Effect in the Induced Hypocrisy Paradigm? Mirror, Mirror on the Wall…. Psychological Reports, Ammons Scientific, In press, 〈10.1177/0033294117730845〉. 〈hal-01621535〉

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