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Social isolation and enrichment induce unique microRNA signatures in the prefrontal cortex and behavioral changes in mice

Abstract : An extensive body of evidence supports the notion that exposure to an enriched/impoverished environment alters brain functions via epigenetic changes. However, how specific modifications of social environment modulate brain functions remains poorly understood. To address this issue, we investigate the molecular and behavioral consequences of briefly manipulating social settings in young and middle-aged wild-type mice. We observe that, modifications of the social context, only affect the performance in socially related tasks. Social enrichment increases sociability whereas isolation leads to the opposite effect. Our work also pointed out specific miRNA signatures associated to each social environment. These miRNA alterations are reversible and found selectively in the medial prefrontal cortex. Finally, we show that miRNA modifications linked to social enrichment or isolation might target rather different intracellular pathways. Together, these observations suggest that the prefrontal cortex may be a key brain area integrating social information via the modification of precise miRNA networks.
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https://hal-amu.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-03021224
Contributor : Eduardo Gascon <>
Submitted on : Tuesday, November 24, 2020 - 11:15:13 AM
Last modification on : Tuesday, December 8, 2020 - 9:51:48 AM

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Natalia Popa, Flora Boyer, Florence Jaouen, Raoul Belzeaux, Eduardo Gascon. Social isolation and enrichment induce unique microRNA signatures in the prefrontal cortex and behavioral changes in mice. iScience, Elsevier, 2020, pp.101790. ⟨10.1016/j.isci.2020.101790⟩. ⟨hal-03021224⟩

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