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ICAM-1 Kilifi variant is not associated with cerebral and severe malaria pathogenesis in Beninese children

Abstract : Abstract Background Cytoadhesion and sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cells (iRBC) in the microvasculature of vital organs are a major cause of malaria pathology. Several studies have provided evidence on the implication of the human host intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) as a major receptor for iRBCs binding to P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) in the development of severe and cerebral malaria. The genetic polymorphism K29M in the immunoglobulin-like domain of ICAM-1, known as ICAM-1 Kilifi , has been associated with either increased or decreased risk of developing cerebral malaria. Methods To provide more conclusive results, the genetic polymorphism of ICAM-1 Kilifi was assessed by PCR and sequencing in blood samples from 215 Beninese children who presented with either mild or severe malaria including cerebral malaria. Results and conclusions The results showed that in this cohort of Beninese children, the ICAM-1 kilifi variant is present at the frequencies of 0.27, similar to the frequency observed in other African countries. This ICAM-1 kilifi variant was not associated with disease severity in agreement with other findings from the Gambia, Tanzania, Malawi, Gabon, and Thailand, suggesting no evidence of a direct link between this polymorphism and the pathogenesis of severe and cerebral malaria.
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Submitted on : Wednesday, May 25, 2022 - 2:50:50 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, June 1, 2022 - 3:37:50 AM

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Samuel Odarkwei Blankson, Danielle Seri Dadjé, Nadjla Traikia, Maroufou Alao, Serge Ayivi, et al.. ICAM-1 Kilifi variant is not associated with cerebral and severe malaria pathogenesis in Beninese children. Malaria Journal, BioMed Central, 2022, 21 (1), pp.115. ⟨10.1186/s12936-022-04139-0⟩. ⟨hal-03678651⟩

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