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Les négociants marseillais et l'Afrique au XIXe siècle : enjeux économiques et positionnements politiques

Abstract : At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the port of Marseille completely opened up to Africa. To Algeria, obviously, but also Tunisia, Egypt, the Western and Eastern coast and Madagascar. With a freight traffic close to 180,000 tons in 1860, the African continent stood out in the mid-nineteenth century as the port of Marseille’s second business partner. The widening of the commercial scene came within two successive political positionings prompted by the merchants. First, they sought a commercial expansion through an agreement with the established African authorities, except in Algeria which was a special case. Then, from 1880, they resolved to develop their business in a colonial setting. This article’s aim is to understand the dynamics of this shift.
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https://hal-amu.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01472463
Contributor : Delphine Cavallo Connect in order to contact the contributor
Submitted on : Monday, February 20, 2017 - 5:39:58 PM
Last modification on : Thursday, February 24, 2022 - 10:08:29 PM

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Xavier Daumalin. Les négociants marseillais et l'Afrique au XIXe siècle : enjeux économiques et positionnements politiques. Virginie Chaillou-Atrous, Jean-François Klein et Antoine Resche (dir.). Les négociants européens et le monde. Histoire d'une mise en connexion, PUR, pp.93-109, 2016, 978-2-7535-4874-9. ⟨hal-01472463⟩

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