Being hypocritical disturbs some people more than others: How individual differences in preference for consistency moderate the behavioral effects of the induced-hypocrisy paradigm

Abstract : This article examines if individual differences in preference for consistency affect the behavioral change in the induced-hypocrisy paradigm. Undergraduate students (N=108) completed the PFC scale either one month (no PFC-focus condition) or immediately before (PFC-focus condition) the induced-hypocrisy procedure; this procedure includes pro-social advocacy, transgression recall, and a behavioral change measure. Results demonstrated 1) that PFC-level predicts behavioral change only when the participants were focused on their own PFC, 2) a relationship between the number of recalled transgressions and behavioral change only for high-PFC participants in PFC-focus condition. The necessity of considering simultaneously PFC-level, PFC-focus and the number of recalled transgressions to better predict behavioral change in the hypocrisy-paradigm, is discussed
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Journal articles
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https://hal-amu.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01622620
Contributor : Valérie Fointiat <>
Submitted on : Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - 3:12:27 PM
Last modification on : Thursday, February 7, 2019 - 2:41:54 PM

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Cécile Sénémeaud, Jessica Mange, Valérie Fointiat, Alain Somat. Being hypocritical disturbs some people more than others: How individual differences in preference for consistency moderate the behavioral effects of the induced-hypocrisy paradigm. Social Influence, Taylor & Francis (Routledge), 2014, 9 (2), pp.133 - 148. ⟨10.1080/15534510.2013.791235⟩. ⟨hal-01622620⟩

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