Effect of Nutrient and Micronutrient Intake on Chylomicron Production and Postprandial Lipemia - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Nutrients Year : 2019

Effect of Nutrient and Micronutrient Intake on Chylomicron Production and Postprandial Lipemia

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Abstract

Postprandial lipemia, which is one of the main characteristics of the atherogenic dyslipidemia with fasting plasma hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and an increase of small and dense low-density lipoproteins is now considered a causal risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Postprandial lipemia, which is mainly related to the increase in chylomicron production, is frequently elevated in individuals at high cardiovascular risk such as obese or overweight patients, type 2 diabetic patients and subjects with a metabolic syndrome who share an insulin resistant state. It is now well known that chylomicron production and thus postprandial lipemia is highly regulated by many factors such as endogenous factors: circulating factors such as hormones or free fatty acids, genetic variants, circadian rhythms, or exogenous factors: food components, dietary supplements and prescription drugs. In this review, we focused on the effect of nutrients, micronutrients and phytochemicals but also on food structure on chylomicron production and postprandial lipemia.
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hal-02487091 , version 1 (02-03-2020)

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Attribution - CC BY 4.0

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Charles Desmarchelier, Patrick A Borel, Denis Lairon, Marie Maraninchi, Rene Valero. Effect of Nutrient and Micronutrient Intake on Chylomicron Production and Postprandial Lipemia. Nutrients, 2019, 11 (6), pp.1299. ⟨10.3390/nu11061299⟩. ⟨hal-02487091⟩

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